If you want to learn more about and support indigenous peoples in the United States, we’ve compiled a list of sustainable fashion brands which are indegenous-owned and whose products are created by Native Americans around the country. We’ve also linked these brands’ websites and Instagram accounts for easy browsing and so that you look through the wide range of products featured, from jewelry to bags and clothes to metalwork.

Isabella Bonito, Matthew Chang, Nadia Puteri & Callista Sukohardjo
October 12, 2020

Native American Owned Businesses and Nonprofits You Should Know About

Sustainable Fashion Brands

Learn more about and support indigenous people in the United States! We’ve compiled a list of sustainable fashion brands which are indigenous-owned and whose products are created by Native Americans around the country. We’ve also linked these brands’ websites, and Instagram accounts for easy browsing and so that you look through the wide range of products featured, from jewelry to bags and clothes to metalwork.

Orenda Tribe

@orendatribe

Some of the products that the Orenda Tribe sells include both men and women’s clothing along with jewelry, crafted by a small team of artists and makers from around the world, including indigenous artists from Dinétah, which is the traditional homeland of the Navajo.

Yellowtail

@byellowtail

Designed by Northern Cheyenne & Crow fashion designer Bethany Yellowtail, this store’s products are handmade by a collective of Native American, First Nation, and Indigenous creators, all of whom hail from Tribal Nations throughout North America. Among their products are men and women’s clothing, along with jewelry.

Kanaine

@kanaine_shop

Kanaine’s products are all handmade by Sydelle, who is enrolled with the Cayuse, Walla Walla, and Yakama people of Oregon and Washington. She sells bags, cowls, and apparel, among other things.

Ahlazua

@ahlazuafinearts

Ahlazua creator Rykelle is enrolled with the Mvskoke Creek Nation, and her tribes include Choctaw, Euchee-Mvskoke Creek, and Diné of the Southwest and Southeast United States. Ahlazua sells jewelry, along with metalwork and printmaking fine arts.

New Mexico Peppers

@newmexicopeppers

This store sells traditional New Mexico Native American jewelry for men, women, and children, along with sand paintings made by the Native Americans of New Mexico, the Land of Enchantment, including the Navajo tribe.

These are just some of the sustainable fashion brands currently owned and operated by indigenous peoples of the United States, but there are much more available not on this list too. Be sure to do your own research and explore the vast array of sustainable Native American fashion brands that the United States has to offer, and incorporate them into your lifestyle.

Native American Owned Companies

We’ve gathered a list of Native American-owned companies that are located around the United States and produce an array of products, from body and beauty to food and drink. We’ve also linked these brands’ websites and Instagram accounts for easy browsing and so that you look through the wide range of products featured!

Sequoia Soaps

@sequoiasoaps

Sequoia Soaps is a company that produces candles, soap, body care, and other wellness and beauty products founded by Michaelee Lazore, who is Kanien'kehá:ka (Mohawk) from Akwesáhsne and Northern Paiute from Nevada.

Séka Hills

@sekahills

Séka Hills is a food and wine company that manufactures wine, olive oil, honey, vinegar, and nuts among other things. Their products are created by the Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation of Capay Valley, California.

Natives Outdoors

@nativesoutdoors

Natives Outdoors is an outdoor apparel company that partners with different Native American designers and artists to produce their clothes, including people such as Vernan Kee who is of the Diné tribe.

Native Coffee Traders

Native Coffee Traders specializes in coffee and tea products, which are created by a network of native communities from family farms in Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Peru to Native American Nation Territories in North America.

Sisters Sage

@sisters_sage

Sisters Sage is a wellness and beauty company that sells soap, smudge, salves, and bathbombs among other wellness and beauty products. It was founded by Lynn-Marie and Melissa-Rae Angus, sisters with Gitxaala, Nisga’a, and Metis Nations heritages.


These are just some of the currently owned and operated Native American businesses found in the United States, but there are many more available not on this list too. Be sure to do your own research and explore the vast array of large and small indigenous businesses that the United States has to offer, and incorporate them into your lifestyle.

Non-Profits

Last but not least, we’ve arranged a list of non-profit organizations that are focused on serving and protecting Native Americans and their land, heritage, and culture. We’ve also linked these organizations’ websites and social media accounts for easy browsing and so that you look through the wide range of causes that these organizations are supporting and what you can do to support them.

Indigenous Environmental Network

Facebook, Twitter

The Indigenous Environmental Network’s (IEN) mission is to protect the sacredness of Mother Earth from contamination and exploitation by strengthening, maintaining and respecting Indigenous teachings and natural laws. This organization is led by Executive Director, Tom Goldtooth who is of Diné and Dakota ancestry, their headquarters are located in Bemidji, Minnesota, and they serve in both the United States and Canada.

WELRP - White Earth Land Recovery Project

Facebook

The White Earth Land Recovery Project (WELRP) is another non-profit organization whose mission is to facilitate the recovery of the original land base of the White Earth Indian Reservation while preserving and restoring traditional practices of sound land stewardship, language fluency, community development, and strengthening our spiritual and cultural heritage. Founded by Winona LaDuke who hails from the Ojibwe Tribe, their headquarters are Callaway, Minnesota and they serve the White Earth Indian Reservation in Minnesota.

Native Renewables

Facebook, Instagram, Twitter

Native Renewables is a nonprofit organization with a mission to empower Native American families to achieve energy independence by growing renewable energy capacity and affordable access to off-grid power. Co-founded by Whaleah Johns of the Navajo tribe and Suzanne Singer also of the Navajo tribe, their headquarters are in Oakland, California and they serve people all around the United States.

Redhawk Native American Arts Council

Facebook, Instagram, Twitter

The Redhawk Native American Arts Council’s mission is to educate the general public about Native American heritage through song, dance, theater, works of art, and other cultural forms of expression with artists represented from North, South, Central American, Caribbean, and Polynesian indigenous cultures. Led by Director Cliff Matias of the Kichwa tribe, the organization’s headquarters are located in New York City and they serve communities all throughout the Northeastern side of the United States.

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women USA

Facebook

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women USA (MMIW USA) is an organization with the mission to bring our missing home and help the families of the murdered cope and support them through the process of grief. Their work is especially crucial now as there is a US and Canadian epidemic of indigenous women being disproportionately murdered with ties to systemic racism. Founded by Deborah Maytubee Denton-Shipman, this organization serves all over the United States.

If you want to learn more about sustainable Native American fashion brands, businesses, and non-profit organizations, or environmentalism and sustainability in general, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter, stay tuned for more blog posts, and follow us on Instagram @wellmadewrld !

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